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Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa

Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa

Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa

This book, in presenting case studies of public participation in democratic governance in South Africa, examines the voluntary activities by which members of the public, directly or indirectly, share in the processes of governance through democratic institutions. Some of the case studies are literature bound; some are qualitative and others quantitative in their approach; some reflect elements of all three approaches. They enhance the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of South Africa's young democracy and, as such, assist in the examination of sustaining democracy in the longer term. Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa does not pretend to have concluded the puzzle about optimum levels of participation in a functioning democracy. In examining political participation since 1994 (the founding elections), but more specifically since 1996 (when the new Constitution was adopted), focus has been predominantly drawn to interest group participation in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac); the participation of civil society and the legislatures in the formulation of the budget; public participation in legislative processes within provincial legislatures; and public participation in the integrated development planning processes of local government. Each case study outlines a number of opportunities for, and constraints to, public participation in democratic processes and is intended to invoke (and provoke) debate.

Democracy, governance, service delivery and society

  • Product Information
  • Format: 148mm x 210mm
  • Pages: 314
  • ISBN 13: 978-07969-1983-0
  • Rights: Southern Africa Rights Only

This book, in presenting case studies of public participation in democratic governance in South Africa, examines the voluntary activities by which members of the public, directly or indirectly, share in the processes of governance through democratic institutions. Some of the case studies are literature bound; some are qualitative and others quantitative in their approach; some reflect elements of all three approaches. They enhance the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of South Africa's young democracy and, as such, assist in the examination of sustaining democracy in the longer term. Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa does not pretend to have concluded the puzzle about optimum levels of participation in a functioning democracy. In examining political participation since 1994 (the founding elections), but more specifically since 1996 (when the new Constitution was adopted), focus has been predominantly drawn to interest group participation in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac); the participation of civil society and the legislatures in the formulation of the budget; public participation in legislative processes within provincial legislatures; and public participation in the integrated development planning processes of local government. Each case study outlines a number of opportunities for, and constraints to, public participation in democratic processes and is intended to invoke (and provoke) debate.

List of Tables
List of Contributors
Foreword
Acronyms
1. Introduction
2. Interest group participation in the National Economic Development and Labour Council
3. The participation of civil society and the legislatures in the formulation of the budget
4. The social dynamics of public participation in legislative processes in South Africa
5. Public participation in the integrated development planning processes of local government in Pretoria
6. Conclusion
Index

The main editor of Public Participation in Democratic Governance in South Africa was Gregory Houston, assisted by Richard Humphries and Ian Liebenberg.

Presets Color

Primary
Secondary