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Cricket and Conquest 1795-1914

Cricket and Conquest 1795-1914

The first of its kind for any sport in South Africa. A cricket love story of epic dimensions with details which will blow readers away. Cricket and Conquest goes back to the beginnings 221 years ago and fundamentally revises long-established foundational narratives of early South African cricket. It reaches beyond old whites-only mainstream histories to integrate at every stage and in every region the experiences of black and women cricketers. A purely British military game at first, cricket accompanied the process of colonial conquest every step of the way in the nineteenth century. This book and its companion volumes explains how racism came to be built into the very fabric of cricket's 'culture' and 'traditions', and how it was uncannily tied to the broader historical processes that shaped South Africa. The unique experiences of our different cricket communities are described in ways that have not been done before. The exhaustive research and inter-connections highlighted here makes this a COMPLETELY NEW general history of South African cricket.

Best Red

  • Product Information
  • Format: 210 x 148 mm
  • Pages: 536 pages
  • ISBN 13: 978-1-9282-4613-8
  • Publish Year: Best Red
  • Rights: World rights

The first of its kind for any sport in South Africa. A cricket love story of epic dimensions with details which will blow readers away. Cricket and Conquest goes back to the beginnings 221 years ago and fundamentally revises long-established foundational narratives of early South African cricket. It reaches beyond old whites-only mainstream histories to integrate at every stage and in every region the experiences of black and women cricketers. A purely British military game at first, cricket accompanied the process of colonial conquest every step of the way in the nineteenth century. This book and its companion volumes explains how racism came to be built into the very fabric of cricket's 'culture' and 'traditions', and how it was uncannily tied to the broader historical processes that shaped South Africa. The unique experiences of our different cricket communities are described in ways that have not been done before. The exhaustive research and inter-connections highlighted here makes this a COMPLETELY NEW general history of South African cricket.

Introduction

PART I: WAR GAME: CRICKET, CONQUEST AND COLONIALISM IN SOUTHERN AFRICA, 1795-1870s

  1. Cricket comes by boat to Africa
  2. First port of call: Cape Town, 1795 onwards
  3. Second port of call: The eastern Cape, 1810s onwards
  4. The beginnings of a unique African cricket tradition
  5. Berthing in Port Natal, 1840s onwards
  6. Cricket reaches the interior Highveld: The Boer Republics, 1850s onwards
  7. The New Rush: Diamonds, dust and cricket in a new territory called Griqualand West, 1870s onwards
  8. Southern Africa and the spread of cricket across the world

PART II: AFRICA’S FIRST COMPETITIONS, 1876 TO 1890s

  1. Cricket, war and change
  2. Champion Bat ushers in new era: The launch of Inter-Town tournaments, 1875/76 onwards
  3. ‘Native’ Champions: A second Inter-Town tournament, 1884/85 onwards
  4. Abantu nabaNgesi (‘The people and the English’): Cricket, colour and citizenship in the 1880s
  5. The MCC of the Cape Colony: Stiff upper lips in the ‘classaic and perennially fragrant metropolis’
  6. The balance shifts from the Military to the Money: The rise of Kimberley and the birth of Johannesburg
  7. Subjugated memory: Reconstituting the statistical record of cricket (The Inter- Town Tournaments, 1876-1898)

PART III: THE DOORS OPEN: THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL TOUR AND THE VISION OF AN INCLUSIVE FUTURE, 1888-1892

  1. ‘Time for South Africa to send Home something besides gold, diamonds and millionaires’: From Inter-Town to International cricket
  2. First international team arrives in Africa
  3. Journey that inscribed Empire and Cricket onto the landscape of a sub-continent
  4. The first South African team and test matches
  5. ‘Home’, ‘New Chums’ and the assertion of South African cricket identities
  6. ‘Gentlemen, we beg you to reconsider your decision’: The position of African cricketers going into the 1890s
  7. ‘The most gorgeous of Eastern spectacles’: A third Inter-Town Tournament launched, January 1890
  8. The formation of the South Africa Cricket Association, April 1890
  9. Cricket and the Imperial mission: The rise of Johannesburg and the first Currie Cup
  10. ‘What Man’s Accomplish’d Ye Can Do’: The first black national team, April 1891
  11. Demon Spofforth of Africa: Black cricketers push for an inclusive system and get their first taste of international competition, March 1892

PART IV: THE DOORS CLOSE: INSTITUTIONALISING CRICKET AS A SPORT FOR ‘EUROPEANS’ AND MEN ONLY

  1. Fateful decision: Rhodes and Milton exclude Krom Hendricks from the first South African tour to Britain, 1894
  2. The Cape Town establishment institutionalises racism in cricket
  3. The colour bar becomes fixed
  4. One cricketer who bucked the system
  5. ‘Neither ladies nor cricketers’: Women and exclusions of another kind
  6. Women at the crease
  7. Imperialism, racism and the shaping of a national cricket ethos

PART V: PROVINCIAL AND INTERNATIONAL CRICKET BECOME THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF A NATIONAL GAME, 1890-1914

  1. Formation of the South African Coloured Cricket Board, 1903
  2. The first Currie Cup and Barnato Memorial Trophy tournaments
  3. Old wine in new vessels: Five cricket provinces in the Cape Colony
  4. New entrants to representative cricket (Transvaal, Natal, Orange Free State and Rhodesia)
  5. ‘Strengthening the bonds of Union within the Empire’: South Africa (SACA) in international cricket before World War 1

Bibliography

Acknowledgements

Index

Andre Odendaal, the lead writer and project co-ordinator of this book and the three accompanying volumes, is an Honorary Professor in History and Heritage Studies at the University of the Western Cape. After graduating with a PhD in History from Cambridge University, he taught at UWC and was Founding Director of both the Mayibuye Centre for History and Culture in South Africa and the Robben Island Museum, the first heritage institution of the new South African democracy.  After this, he took over for ten years as CEO at the historic Newlands Cricket Ground and the successful Cape Cobras professional team and Western Province. He played first-class cricket for Boland (SACU), Transvaal and Western Province (SACB), as well as Cambridge University in England. An anti-apartheid activist in the 1980s, he was the only provincial cricketer designated ‘white’ to join the non-racial SACOS during the apartheid years. He chaired the UCBSA’s Transformation Monitoring Committee from 1998 to 2002. In that year he received the President’s Award for Sport (Silver Class) for his contribution to bringing about change in sport.  Andre has written ten books on the history of the liberation struggle and the social history of sport in South Africa, including Vukani Bantu! (1984), The Story of an African Game (2003) and The Founders (2012). He is currently also research consultant and writer for the Albie Sachs Trust on Constitutionalism and the Rule of Law.

Krish Reddy has painstakingly recovered much of the lost statistical records of black and non-racial cricket in Natal and South Africa, details of which were published regularly in the Mutual and Federal South African Cricket Annual from 1996 to 2004. In 1986 he compiled a history of the Natal Cricket Board as part of their 25th anniversary celebrations. He is the author of The Other Side: A miscellany of black cricket in Natal, published in 1999 and also the co-author with Ashwin Desai, Vishnu Padayachee and Goolam Vahed of Blacks in Whites, a century of cricket struggles in KwaZulu-Natal, published in 2002.

The UK-based Association of Cricket Statisticians and Historians chose him as their Statistician of the Year in 2007 for his research on the scores of 223 first-class matches in non-racial cricket in South Africa during the period 1971 to 1991. In December 2009 he was awarded the ICC Volunteers’ Medal ‘in recognition of outstanding service to cricket’. After several years of close involvement with the non-racial Natal Cricket Board, Krish served a three-year term on the executive of the KwaZulu-Natal Cricket Union after unity in 1991. He was also a provincial selector for ten consecutive seasons from 1996/97 to 2005/06. A retired school principal, Krish is a patron of the Kwa-Zulu/Natal Cricket Union.

Christopher Merrett was born in Britain, grew up in the Bahamas and has lived in South Africa since 1975. He has a BA (Hons) degree in Geography, Masters degrees in Library Science and Geography, and a PhD in History – from the universities of Oxford, Sheffield, Natal and Cape Town. Christopher worked for thirty years in libraries, becoming University Librarian at University of Natal (Pietermaritzburg campus) in 1996. After serving as Director of Administration on the same campus from 2002 to 2007, he
switched careers and spent seven years in the newsroom of The Witness. His writing has concentrated on the history and politics of South African sport; human rights issues; and the local history of Pietermaritzburg. He has written or co-authored five books including A Culture of Censorship: Secrecy and Intellectual Repression in South Africa (1994) and Caught Behind: Race and Politics in Springbok Cricket (with Bruce Murray, 2004). A member of the path-breaking Aurora Cricket Club from 1979, he umpired nearly one hundred league and inter-district matches, and two SACB first-class matches in 1982. He was also secretary of the Maritzburg District Cricket Union for five years and contributed to the protests against rebel teams who defied the sports boycott of South Africa. During the State of Emergency of the late 1980s he was a member of the Pietermaritzburg Detainees Support Committee and was charged with two others under the Foreign Funding Act.

Jonty Winch grew up in Zimbabwe and has worked in education, journalism and photography in southern Africa and Britain.
He received a Master of Arts degree with distinction from De Montfort University’s International Centre for Sports History and Culture and was then awarded his PhD from the University of Stellenbosch. He has written six books including Cricket’s Rich Heritage: A History of Rhodesian and Zimbabwean Cricket 1890-1982; Cricket in Southern Africa: Two Hundred Years of Achievements and Records; and England’s Youngest Captain: the Life and Times of Monty Bowden and Two South African Journalists. He has also produced articles for accredited international academic journals, winning the British Society of Sports History’s ‘Best Article in Sport in History’ in 2008.  His path-breaking writing on the development of imperial games in nineteenth-century South Africa has helped create a better understanding of the connections between sport and politics at that time.  Jonty’s sporting interests have included playing rugby in Italy and coaching touring teams to Spain (Wits University canoeing) and to England (a basketball team from Zimbabwe).

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