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South African foreign policy review volume 4

South African foreign policy review volume 4

Ramaphosa and a new dawn for South African foreign policy President Cyril Ramaphosa’s notion of a New Dawn as the clarion call for his presidency is yet to manifest fully in South Africa’s foreign policy. However, some changes are already indicating a departure from the Zuma era’s foreign policy. Ramaphosa’s emphasis on foreign direct investment and trade seems to be the cornerstone of his tenure’s foreign policy.

Open Access Politics and international relations

  • Product Information
  • Format: 240mm x 168mm (Soft Cover)
  • Pages: 416
  • ISBN 13: 978-0-7983-0536-5
  • Rights: World Rights

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Ramaphosa and a new dawn for South African foreign policy President Cyril Ramaphosa’s notion of a New Dawn as the clarion call for his presidency is yet to manifest fully in South Africa’s foreign policy. However, some changes are already indicating a departure from the Zuma era’s foreign policy. Ramaphosa’s emphasis on foreign direct investment and trade seems to be the cornerstone of his tenure’s foreign policy. Besides this, some other developments and continuities require deeper reflection; one of the objectives of the fourth volume of the highly successful South African Foreign Policy Review series. Broadly reflecting and assessing the Ramaphosa era, the volume intends to focus on foreign policy leadership, architecture, diplomacy, questions such as national interests and national identity, and South Africa’s bi- and multilateral relations. Contributors to volume 4 include South African and international experts, and will, like previous volumes, be of great use to diplomats, academics, students, government officials, parliamentarians, politicians, the media, and civil society. Volume 4 continues to build on the analysis of South Africa’s conduct internationally. The Review fills a gap in the continuity of South African Foreign policy analysis, providing an important resource for tracing trends and developments. If the country is to maintain and grow its role in the region and international affairs more broadly, the public, scholars, and practitioners need to be able to take stock of how the country has conducted itself internationally so far and how it could improve on a number of fronts including areas such as regional leadership, balancing principles and practice, and supporting diplomatic practice. The fourth volume of the South African Foreign Policy Review, edited by Lesley Masters, Jo Ansie van Wyk, and Philani Mthembu, includes 18 chapters. The analysis reviews the conduct of South African foreign policy and focuses on key themes, with a particular focus on the Ramaphosa administration and the idea of a ‘New Dawn’. The book considers the norms and values, architecture, and practice of foreign policy by exploring conceptual frameworks and reviewing diplomacy in practice.

Dedication

Acknowledgments

Acronyms and abbreviations

Part 1: Introducing the new dawn Chapter 1: A New Dawn for South African Foreign Policy?

Lesley Masters, Philani Mthembu, Jo-Ansie van Wyk

Part 2: The new dawn: reimagining ideas, norms, and identity

Chapter 2: South African Foreign Policy and the search for ontological security

Bianca Naude

Chapter 3: To be or not to be? Is South Africa a good international citizen?

Suzanne Graham

Chapter 4: The Art of Reconciling Power and Morality: South Africa’s Norm Entrepreneurship under Cyril Ramaphosa

Marcel Nargar

Part 3: Constructing the new dawn: Architecture, Actors and in Instruments in South African Foreign Policy

Chapter 5: Parliament and International Agreements: A systems perspective to foreign policy oversight

Natalie Leibrandt-Loxton

Chapter 6: The Youth and South African Foreign Policy: Influences or Passive observers

Sven Botha

Chapter 7: South Africa’s Maritime Diplomacy Lisa Otto

Chapter 8: South Africa’s defence diplomacy: a viable instrument of foreign and security policy Faith Mabera

Chapter 9: Towards the urbanisation of foreign policy in South Africa?

Fritz Nganje and Odilile Ayodele

Chapter 10: South Africa and COVID-19: foreign policy implications and health diplomacy

Jo-Ansie van Wyk, Lesley Masters, Philani Mthembu

Part 4: Searching for a Niche in the New Dawn: South Africa in the World

Chapter 11: South Africa’s Quest for Continental Peace and Security

Cheryl Hendricks

Chapter 12: Women, Peace and Security and

the African Continental Free Trade Area:

Consolidating the nexus in South Africa’s

foreign policy

Nadira Bayat and David Luke

Chapter 13: South Africa’s Economic

Diplomacy in Africa

Chris Vandome

Chapter 14: South African engagement in club

governance: A boon for economic diplomacy

Arina Muresan

Chapter 15: South Africa’s campaigns to lead

multilateral organisations (tbc)

Jo-Ansie van Wyk

Chapter 16: Constituting a post-hegemonic

world order? Canada, South Africa and the

fragility of ‘middlepowerism’

David R. Black and David J. Hornsby

Chapter 17: Conflicting Perspectives and

Cooperative Connections: South African – US

Relations during the Ramaphosa

administration

Christopher Williams

Conclusion: A new dawn deferred?

Chapter 18 Title:

Philani Mthembu and Francis Kornegay

Contributors

Index

Dedication

Acknowledgments

Acronyms and abbreviations

Part 1: Introducing the new dawn Chapter 1: A New Dawn for South African Foreign Policy?

Lesley Masters, Philani Mthembu, Jo-Ansie van Wyk

Part 2: The new dawn: reimagining ideas, norms, and identity

Chapter 2: South African Foreign Policy and the search for ontological security

Bianca Naude

Chapter 3: To be or not to be? Is South Africa a good international citizen?

Suzanne Graham

Chapter 4: The Art of Reconciling Power and Morality: South Africa’s Norm Entrepreneurship under Cyril Ramaphosa

Marcel Nargar

Part 3: Constructing the new dawn: Architecture, Actors and in Instruments in South African Foreign Policy

Chapter 5: Parliament and International Agreements: A systems perspective to foreign policy oversight

Natalie Leibrandt-Loxton

Chapter 6: The Youth and South African Foreign Policy: Influences or Passive observers

Sven Botha

Chapter 7: South Africa’s Maritime Diplomacy Lisa Otto

Chapter 8: South Africa’s defence diplomacy: a viable instrument of foreign and security policy Faith Mabera

Chapter 9: Towards the urbanisation of foreign policy in South Africa?

Fritz Nganje and Odilile Ayodele

Chapter 10: South Africa and COVID-19: foreign policy implications and health diplomacy

Jo-Ansie van Wyk, Lesley Masters, Philani Mthembu

Part 4: Searching for a Niche in the New Dawn: South Africa in the World

Chapter 11: South Africa’s Quest for Continental Peace and Security

Cheryl Hendricks

Chapter 12: Women, Peace and Security and

the African Continental Free Trade Area:

Consolidating the nexus in South Africa’s

foreign policy

Nadira Bayat and David Luke

Chapter 13: South Africa’s Economic

Diplomacy in Africa

Chris Vandome

Chapter 14: South African engagement in club

governance: A boon for economic diplomacy

Arina Muresan

Chapter 15: South Africa’s campaigns to lead

multilateral organisations (tbc)

Jo-Ansie van Wyk

Chapter 16: Constituting a post-hegemonic

world order? Canada, South Africa and the

fragility of ‘middlepowerism’

David R. Black and David J. Hornsby

Chapter 17: Conflicting Perspectives and

Cooperative Connections: South African – US

Relations during the Ramaphosa

administration

Christopher Williams

Conclusion: A new dawn deferred?

Chapter 18 Title:

Philani Mthembu and Francis Kornegay

Contributors

Index

Presets Color

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