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Protecting our Cultural Capital

Protecting our Cultural Capital

The political transition of 1994 foregrounded the debate about who we are and what sites, memories or artefacts actually constitute our common heritage as South Africans. This occasional paper discusses the key outcomes from this debate, as well as the limitations in the current structures that prevent other benefits from being realised.

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  • Product Information
  • Format: 148mm x 210mm
  • Pages: 80
  • ISBN 13: 978-07969-2034-8
  • Rights: World Rights

A research plan for the heritage sector The political transition of 1994 foregrounded the debate about who we are and what sites, memories or artefacts actually constitute our common heritage as South Africans. This occasional paper discusses the key outcomes from this debate, as well as the limitations in the current structures that prevent other benefits from being realised.

Introduction

Chapter One: What is Our Heritage?

Heritage, diversity and social cohesion
Defining the heritage sector
Transforming the heritage sector
Conclusions

Chapter Two: Challenges and New Directions
Current challenges for the sector
A research strategy for development in the heritage sector
Conclusions

The authors of this paper all have experience working in the heritage sector. Sandra Prosalendis, the project leader, was director of the District Six Museum from 1994 to 2002. Harriet Deacon, freelance researcher, was research co-ordinator at Robben Island Museum from 1999 to 2002. Sephai Mngqolo has been working in various capacities at the McGregor Museum, Kimberley, since 1982. He is currently head of the Museums Living History Department.

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