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HIV Risk Exposure Among Young Children

HIV Risk Exposure Among Young Children

A study of 2-9 year olds served by public health facilities in the Free State, South Africa South Africa has, until now, focused its HIV prevention efforts on youth and adults, and now needs to expand its focus to include children. Much is already known about vertical transmission, which is the dominant mode of HIV transmission among children. However, little investigation has been done into the potential for horizontal transmission of HIV in the population below reproductive age. This report focuses on children aged 2-9 years and, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, presents evidence on the potential for HIV transmission in dental, maternity and paediatric services in public health facilities. A new finding concerns the practice of shared breastfeeding.

Health and wellbeing Open Access

  • Product Information
  • Format: 210mm x 160mm
  • Pages: 56
  • ISBN 13: 978-07969-2103-1
  • Rights: World Rights

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A study of 2-9 year olds served by public health facilities in the Free State, South Africa South Africa has, until now, focused its HIV prevention efforts on youth and adults, and now needs to expand its focus to include children. Much is already known about vertical transmission, which is the dominant mode of HIV transmission among children. However, little investigation has been done into the potential for horizontal transmission of HIV in the population below reproductive age. This report focuses on children aged 2-9 years and, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, presents evidence on the potential for HIV transmission in dental, maternity and paediatric services in public health facilities. A new finding concerns the practice of shared breastfeeding.

List of tables and figures
Abbreviations

1. Background
2. Objectives and methodology
3. Results
4. Discussion
5. Conclusion and recommendations
6. References

Appendix

A Results of forensic audit conducted at CLS, January 2005
B Description of PLG CD4 methodology used
C Conclusions and recommendations

Addendum 1: PLG CD4: Extended window of testing to 5 days
Addendum 2: Supportive data from R&D, BCI, Miami, FL, USA
Addendum 3: Table of cross-platform equivalency testing
Addendum 4: Performance of laboratories participating in the WHO/QASI/NHLS CD4 REQAS

Bibliography/references

Thomas M. Rehle, M.D., MSc., Ph.D., specialised in tropical medicine and in infectious disease epidemiology and has almost 20 years of expertise in HIV/AIDS/STI, malaria and TB in particular. His extensive work experience with national programmes in the USA and the NGO community in the developing world is complemented by a longstanding close collaboration with UNAIDS/WHO, US and European donor agencies, and other international development organisations. An independent consultant in international health and disease control based in Washington DC since 2001, Dr. Rehle recently joined the HSRC as a Director in the Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS and Health (SAHA) Research Programme.

Dr Olive Shisana is the Executive Director and founder of the Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS and Health Research Programme at the HSRC. Prior to joining the HSRC she served as Professor of Health Systems at the National School of Public Health at the Medical University of Southern Africa, where she was a leading founder of a post-graduate diploma on the management of HIV/AIDS in the world of work, launched by the South African Deputy President in 2001. Before this appointment, she served as Executive Director of Family and Community Health at the World Health Organisation in Geneva. In the latter portfolio, she established the WHO HIV/AIDS/STI initiative, and became a founding member of the Partnership on AIDS in Africa.

Professor Deborah Glencross is the Head of the Division of Flow Cytometry in the Department of Molecular Medicine and Haematology at the University of the Witwatersrand Medical School and the National Health Laboratory Services in Johannesburg.

Mark Colvin is an epidemiologist at the Medical Research Council in Durban.

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